Workshops

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
The Halifax region has over 250 public art projects and installations. These works exist in our parks, waterfronts, public buildings and streets. Public art helps to shape the public spaces that we occupy through communicating information about social and cultural values. In this workshop, students will gain an understanding about how public art serves to shape community identity through creating their own original public art proposals, which will include a small-scale model of what their creation would look like if it were installed in a public space within Halifax.

Students will be guided through the exciting process of creating a proposal for a public
artwork within Halifax. In the first class, students will learn about the history and
significance of public art, with an emphasis on examples from within Nova Scotia. They will
explore different types of public art such as monuments, murals, memorials and abstract
works and will learn about the process to which public art comes into realization, including
the jury selection process, community consultation, funding and landscaping. In the second
class, students will begin to develop their own public art proposals through answering a
worksheet that guides them through questions such as: where will your public art be
located? How will your public art connect to the location it will be situated in? What will
your public art look like? How will the public interact with your public art? Students will
create a detailed coloured drawing of what their public sculpture will look like within its
proposed location.

The following 3-4 classes will be work classes where students will use plasticine, clay,
cardboard, paint, construction paper, pipe-cleaner, glue and other materials to create their
public sculpture models. Students will be encouraged to make their models look as detailed
as possible. Students will also create the location where their public art will be located,
using cardboard, printed or drawn/painted images and other materials.. To help support
their artwork, students will title their proposed artworks and will write a brief description
of what their public artwork represents and how it connects to it’s selected public space.
The final class will be a presentation of the models, where students will briefly present to
the class what they have created.

Materials: cardboard for a base (or cardboard shoebox), modelling clay/plasticine,
pipe-cleaners, wire, paint, markers, pencil crayons, pencils, paper, ruler and scissors.

Grade Levels
4 – 6
Each student will choose a fruit or vegetable to explore. They will draw it and then make a collage based on their observations, drawings and understanding. As an artist and chef, my inspiration for this project comes from a love for fruits and vegetables. I am excited to share the process of making collages inspired by local seasonal produce grown in Nova Scotia. Collage is a fun way to express the beauty of things. It is like a puzzle using different pieces to create a whole. It also teaches layering and planning.

Each student will choose a fruit or vegetable to explore. They will start by drawing its shape and exploring its colour and texture with pastel. Using a diverse selection of paper they will create a beautiful collage based on their drawings and observations. Through take home assignments each student will have the opportunity to learn about the nutritional value of their chosen food and have hands-on learning experiences with their food.

Over four two-hour long sessions students will be led in the process of creating a collage of a fruit or vegetable. The process will differ slightly given the age group and their fine motor skills.

Session 1: We will develop our observational skills of seeing with warm up exercises in contour drawing, and exploring colour, tone and texture with pastels. After this first session each student will choose a fruit or vegetable as their chosen subject.

Session 2: We will use the skills we gained doing contour drawing to create a cutout shape of our chosen food in card stock. This cutout will be the base for our image, giving the students a detailed shape for their final collage. We will also start to collect and cut paper from magazines and other paper sources such as maps etc. creating a pantry of chosen paper.

Session 3: We will plan the layers needed and start to glue down each layer on to the cutout. We will use our pastel drawings as a reference for texture and colour.

Session 4: We will add any finishing layers to our cutouts and create the final composition for our collage. At the end of this session, each student will present their final collage to the class sharing additional experiences from the cross curricular take home assignments*.
Every session will begin with an artist talk and a live demonstration from my home studio. This will give students a chance to see a working artist space. Throughout the two hour session, I will work alongside the students staying available for questions and mentorship.

Materials needed for this project are: HB #2 pencils, oil pastels, sketch paper, collection of paper (magazines, maps, napkins, wrapping paper), glue, small paint brush, scrap paper, heavy paper such as water colour or Bristol board and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Note: This project presents a natural opportunity for cross curricular learning. If teachers are interested, I will work with them to provide take home worksheets that ask students to do a variety of tasks, such as exploring what their food tastes like, helping them to describe this experience with questions like ‘was it sweet, salty, tart or spicy?’ The take home tasks would be a collaborative between myself and the teacher.

Grade Levels
10 – 12
In this workshop, students will receive a hands-on, crash course in comics creation, where they will learn basic techniques and tips, and get a start on writing their own short comics. Topics addressed include the character design, panel layout and story writing.

Workshop Overview: In this Intro to Comics Workshop, students will receive a hands-on, crash course in comics creation, where they will learn basic techniques and tips, and get a start on writing their own short comics.

Day 1:
● I will introduce myself and my work, including my graphic novel, Kettle Harbour (10 min)
● A brief presentation of the world of comics! We will discuss their rich history, with a focus on Canada, the U.S.A and Japan, and the various formats they can take today – from printed comics and graphic novels to webcomics. (30 minutes)
● Students will complete two exercises in character design and panel layout. We will think about how to create consistently recognizable characters exhibiting a full range of emotions. Then, by studying meaningful examples, they will think about how to apply this character to a comic page in visually dynamic ways. (approx 30 minutes per exercise)
● Introduce Day 2’s activity (writing a pencil draft,) and encourage students to think start thinking about ideas (10 minutes)

Day 2:
● Brief overview on workplace health & safety for comic book writing (It’s serious!) (5-10 minutes)
● Short presentation on the steps and materials needed for hand-drawn comic creation: story writing, pencils, inking, scanning, colouring, digital touch ups, and lettering. (30 minutes)
● Students will begin on a pencil draft for a minimum four-page comic book. I will provide writing prompts, if necessary. Students will start by roughly blocking in ideas on paper booklets (8.5 x 11 paper folded in half), to give them a sense of how pages fit into spreads, and when ready, redraw a finer draft on sheets of 8.5 x 11 paper (one page per sheet of paper). (1 hr, 15 min)

Follow up:
If arranged with the Teacher, completed pencil drafts can later be submitted to me for written feedback.

Intended Audience: This workshop is designed for use in High School Art classrooms and is adaptable for use in English and History classrooms. In these settings, students may explore adapting a narrative or document for comic books, such as a primary source or short story.
Classroom Prep: Exercise handouts will be sent to the Teachers in advance for distribution to students.

Materials:
Day 1: Printed out exercise handouts, Pencils (HB-2B - mechanical pencils are better); Pencil Sharpeners (if using regular pencils) & Erasers, regular rulers.
Day 2: As above, at least 2 sheets of 8.5 x 11 bond white paper per student, plus at least 4 sheets of 8.5 x 11 or 9x 12 white drawing paper/mixed media paper or bristol paper of a slightly higher quality/thickness. Regular paper works in a pinch.

Also nice to have: Triangle rulers with 90 degree angle are great to have on hand. Any rulers and tools from a standard geometry kit. Stencils (of circles, letters, etc) are also neat.

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
Explore the history of self-portraits of the past to selfie culture of today and create your own pop art inspired selfie art.

Day 1: We’ll start with a bit of art history, the progression from the artist self-portrait to selfie culture of today, and finish with a brief history of Roy Lichtenstein and his pop art portrait style. To end day 1 they will use a cell phones to take a SQUARE reference photos for their own Lichtenstein inspired selfie art.

**The teacher will need to print the chosen selfie as an 8X8 square reference for day 2.

Day 2: First I will go over some tips and tricks for drawing properly proportioned portraits. Then I will share the gird technique for the students to draw their portrait on a larger poster board surface. Once their image is on the Bristol board they will use markers and or paint with a grid dot technique to block in colours. The next step is to draw over the pencil lines with black permanent marker for the cartoon/ comic book style of Roy Lichtenstein and erase any leftover pencil marks for a clean finish.

Materials: Poster board, paint, markers, pencil, rulers, camera phone

Grade Levels
4 – 6, 7 – 9, 10 – 12
A fun, accessible workshop for students of all ages. Lots of room for individuality and play within a structure that sets participants up for success The project uses safe, affordable materials and all the creativity you want to bring to it!

Focusing on line and shape with a secondary focus on colour, beautiful fish will be created by exploring chalk drawing on a black background and then painting it in with acrylic. Once dry, students will be shown how to use their chalk drawing as a resist technique creating bold black outlines as they wash the chalk away. This step by step painting workshop will be continued over the course of approximately 2-3 days and will encourage students to make choices along the way, allowing for unique and individual results at the end.

Day 1: Prepare Black Canvas & Design Individual Funky Fish 90 minutes
Day 2 : Drawing Your Fish In White Chalk & Painting Our Funky Fish 90 minutes
Day : Wash Off Chalk, Paint Eyes, and Play!

Materials list:
1 primed black canvas/cardboard/watercolour paper per student
acrylic paint
brushes (Medium and small)
water cans/containers
1 white chalk per student
paper towels or rags for washing off chalk
plastic table coverings
aprons or smock/student
blow dryers (to speed up drying process if desired)

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
By using a grid with a 1:1 ratio I will show students how to transfer a reference photo onto paper or canvas. Once the student is finished the base sketch of this transfer they can simply erase or paint over the grid lines and work on their painting or drawing which will then be in perfect proportion.

Students will be working from a photo, they will get the chance to bring in an A4 printout of an image
of their choice or can choose from a wide variety of provided images.

Day 1: I will introducing myself and show how I've used the grid method in my own work. Students
will each get a small booklet providing history and instructions on how to use the grid method as well
as a practice example. Students will have the choice between working on a canvas or heavy paper,
based on their enthusiasm and interest. The student will prepare there reference image and canvas or
paper by drawing a grid on each with a 1:1 ratio using a ruler and a pencil. Students can label their grid
by using letters going across and numbers going down. They can then begin to sketch out there images
using pencil.

Day 2: I will begin by giving a short drawing demonstration. Students can set up there spaces and
materials. Students work on their sketch and begin adding colour by using paint or coloured pencils.
Clean up.

Day 3: Students will set up their work spaces and finish there images. Those who finish early will be
provided another small booklet which will show how to draw optical illusions using the same method.
This booklet will also include history, tips and exercises about drawing and painting. Clean up

Material: mechanical pencils, an eraser, coloured pencils, pencil sharpeners, acrylic paint, paint
brushes, a pallet (cardboard paper with aluminum foil), small stretched canvases or heavy paper, their
reference image, a ruler, paper cups, water, and paper towel.

Grade Levels
4 – 6, 7 – 9, 10 – 12
Using cardboard disks and a variety of yarns, we will create fun cordage based on a traditional japanese braiding technique known as ‘kumihimo’. The cords can be used for bracelets, dog collars, knitting, weaving and more.

In the first session I will briefly go into the history of the technique and tools, and cover a simple four strand braid.
I will begin by introducing myself and give a short presentation on the history of kumihimo, as well as some of the terminology and tools. This should take about 30 minutes. The students will be provided with yarns and cardboard disks, but I will explain how they can make their own as well.

The second session will look at two new braids, each with eight strands. If this is too complex for some students they are more than welcome to continue with the previous braid, but try out new colour combinations and designs.

Most students will only complete a small length in the first session, but can continue working on them at home or in class.

By using cardboard disks, we will be creating braids using the ‘kumihimo’ technique, which is a traditional style of braiding popularized in Japan. It’s similar to the idea of friendship bracelet braiding, however instead of flat braids they will be 3D. I will provide disks, some yarns and step-by-step handouts.

The braiding process is basically crossing the threads up and down, left and right, in certain patterns across the disk. This may come easily to some students, and others may take a bit of time to sort out their directions. I have made some simple handouts that they can follow along with and they may want to write or colour them in as we go. In the first session they will likely end up with short lengths, but will be encouraged to continue at home. With practice it can become a speedy process and they will be able to create bracelets, necklaces, or decorations for their backpacks.

In the second session we will look at two different 8 strand designs using the same disk from the previous session. One will be similar to the first braid that we looked at, but the second will make a round braid. If any students find it a bit tricky they are more than welcome to continue the first braid- but are encouraged to try out new colour combinations and materials.

Once they have finished their braid or if they wish to start a new one, they should be taped or knotted off on either end before cutting the yarns. There is very minimal set up and clean up.

Materials:
• One disk per student
• An assortment of yarns wound onto bobbins
• Handouts
• Scissors
• Tape (electric works best, but masking/scotch tape works as well)
• Pencils, markers
• Cardboard/foamcore/cereal boxes (optional)
• Extra yarns (optional)

Grade Levels
Primary – 3, 4 – 6
This project was designed to use ‘found papers’, that is, paper that you divert from the recycle bin! So it’s also environmental and budget friendly. The open ended nature of collage makes it perfect to be linked to any part of your current curriculum if you choose. Paper collage has been around as an art form since about 1910. It was started by artists Picasso and Braque. The term “collage” comes from the French word coller, or “to glue.”

1. In this PAINTS Project we will look at a some famous collages and have a class discussion. The students will be cued to take note of the language each collage is using; terms like composition, color, texture will be introduced in a grade appropriate way. Students will be asked to imagine and discuss what story each artist is telling. The younger grades benefit from having a printed color collage to copy or interpret - these are often very interesting to see what stands out in their minds with the project.
15 min

2. We will view a brief slideshow of my fine art collages and focus on one collage. I will tell the story of my collage titled; the Lighthouse, which was formed in my mind during a beach walk while the fog was rolling in. We will discuss all of the elements or artistic terms used to tell the story of this collage.
15 min

3. The students will being creating their own collages using found papers and/or construction paper. (The teacher will be given instructions on which papers to save from the recycle bin). Collages will be created on a box board or cardboard which the teachers, students and/or parents can bring from home.
90 min

Materials
Scissors
Glue sticks or school glue
Construction paper
Printed collages
Found papers; Think about cancelled stamps, used envelops, wrapping paper, newspapers, junk mail,

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
This project was designed to use ‘found papers’, that is, paper that you divert from the recycle bin! So it’s also environmental and budget friendly.The open ended nature of collage makes it perfect to be linked to any part of your current curriculum. Paper collage has been around as an art form since about 1910. It was started by artists Picasso and Braque. The term “collage” comes from the French word coller, or “to glue."

Session 1
1. In this PAINTS Project we will look at a some famous collages and have a class discussion. The students will be cued to take note of the language each collage is using; terms like composition, color, texture will be introduced in a grade appropriate way. Students will be asked to imagine and discuss what story each artist is telling.
15 min

2. We will view a brief slideshow of my fine art collages and focus on one collage. I will tell the story of my collage titled; the Lighthouse, which was formed in my mind during a beach walk while the fog was rolling in. We will discuss all of the elements or artistic terms used to tell the story of this collage.
30 min

3. The students will begin creating their own collages using found papers and/or construction paper. (The teacher will be given instructions on which papers to save from the recycle bin). Collages will be created on a box board or cardboard which the teachers, students and/or parents can bring from home.
75 min

Session 2
Students will continue working on their collages.
90min

Materials
Scissors
Glue sticks or school glue
Construction paper
Printed collages
Found papers; Think about cancelled stamps, used envelops, wrapping paper, newspapers, junk mail,

Grade Levels
Primary – 3, 4 – 6
Students will be given a short lesson in embroidery, with demonstration and explanation of a few basic stitches. They will then complete a small (approx. 3” diameter) circular piece of embroidery that will ultimately be backed with felt and turned into a pin-on patch. These embroidery pieces will be inspired by design prompts appropriate to the age, skill level and learning styles of the students participating and can be linked to curriculum that is being covered. Design prompts and degree of complexity of both stitching and design will be adjusted to suit the grade level participating.

Before the project:
- the artist and teacher will communicate about a theme. For example: If a class is studying social movements they could be prompted to choose a simple slogan that is meaningful or relevant to an issue they support or even create logos for a movement of their own design; if a junior high health class is talking about body image/self-confidence they could choose motivational or supportive phrases to stitch; younger grades may just choose a name or favourite word or image that they identify with, or simply stitch freeform designs. No hate speech, derogatory language or violent imagery will be permitted.

Project kits, one per student, will be delivered that will include:
o A design sheet to print out that includes a description of the design prompt/project and a (approx. 3” diameter) template circle for students to practice their designs.
o An illustrated handout showing a few basic embroidery stitches and step-by-step instructions for assembling the patch.
o Embroidery supplies (needles, needle threaders, embroidery hoops, stabilized fabric for stitching the patch, practice fabric for learning stitches, water soluble fabric marking pens)
o Finishing supplies -pre-cut felt circles with pin backs already attached.
o Each participating group will also be sent a collection of embroidery threads (with many colour options) that will be shared amongst the students. Protocol for the sharing of supplies will be discussed with the teacher and we will comply with any pre-existing school policies regarding the sharing of materials.
o Students will be required to have their own scissors, pencils and erasers ready.
o The kits will be clearly labelled with the items that are required to be returned to the bag after the project is completed.

Classroom teachers may wish to discuss the design prompt and project theme with students prior to the first virtual instruction session, especially if it is linked to curriculum or requires background information/discussion.

All students should be prepared with supplies ready prior to beginning the virtual instruction session to make best use of the allotted time.

Session 1: An introduction to Linnet and a brief overview of the project. There will be a basic embroidery lesson, instruction on drawing and transferring their designs onto fabric, and the remainder of the session will be free for students to start stitching their designs. Linnet will take questions and help with troubleshooting during this free stitching time.

Session 2: Primarily devoted to working on stitching the patches, with some instruction near the end for the 4-6 classes to finish their projects. This time will provide an additional opportunity for students to ask questions and for demonstration of more embroidery techniques where required.

Session 3: (for grades 7-12 only) will include finishing instructions for trimming the embroideries, attaching the backing fabric and pin backs to complete the embroidered patches. All stitching of the embroidered designs should be finished prior to this session.

Please Note: Depending on how fast the students are working (and how involved their designs are) classroom teachers may wish to provide some class time between the virtual sessions for students to work on their stitching independently.

The kits will remain with the class for a number of days after the final session to allow for all students to complete the project. At this point all supplies will be returned to the bags and the kits will be returned to PAINTS.

This project can be very simply executed but has ample room for the more creative and engaged students to put in lots of detail and effort. The end results will hopefully be proudly displayed on jackets and backpacks and give students a real sense of accomplishment!!

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
Students will be given a short lesson in embroidery, with demonstration and explanation of a few basic stitches. They will then complete a small (approx. 3” diameter) circular piece of embroidery that will ultimately be backed with felt and turned into a pin-on patch. These embroidery pieces will be inspired by design prompts appropriate to the age, skill level and learning styles of the students participating and can be linked to curriculum that is being covered. Design prompts and degree of complexity of both stitching and design will be adjusted to suit the grade level participating.

Before the project:
- the artist and teacher will communicate about a theme. For example: If a class is studying social movements they could be prompted to choose a simple slogan that is meaningful or relevant to an issue they support or even create logos for a movement of their own design; if a junior high health class is talking about body image/self-confidence they could choose motivational or supportive phrases to stitch; younger grades may just choose a name or favourite word or image that they identify with, or simply stitch freeform designs. No hate speech, derogatory language or violent imagery will be permitted.

Sealed project kits, one per student will be delievered in advance, and will include:
o A design sheet to print out that includes a description of the design prompt/project and a (approx. 3” diameter) template circle for students to practice their designs.
o An illustrated handout showing a few basic embroidery stitches and step-by-step instructions for assembling the patch.
o Embroidery supplies (needles, needle threaders, embroidery hoops, stabilized fabric for stitching the patch, practice fabric for learning stitches, water soluble fabric marking pens)
o Finishing supplies
Pin backs and felt squares for backing

o Each participating group will also be sent a collection of embroidery threads (with many colour options) that will be shared amongst the students. Protocol for the sharing of supplies will be discussed with the teacher and we will comply with any pre-existing school policies regarding the sharing of materials.
o Students will be required to have their own scissors, pencils and erasers ready.
o The kits will be clearly labeled with the items that are required to be returned to the bag after the project is completed.
- Classroom teachers may wish to discuss the design prompt and project theme with students prior to the first virtual instruction session, especially if it is linked to curriculum or requires background information/discussion.

- All students should be prepared with supplies ready prior to beginning the virtual instruction session to make best use of the allotted time.

Session 1: An introduction to Linnet and a brief overview of the project. There will be a basic embroidery lesson, instruction on drawing and transferring their designs onto fabric, and the remainder of the session will be free for students to start stitching their designs. Linnet will take questions and help with troubleshooting during this free stitching time.

Session 2: Primarily devoted to working on stitching the patches, with some instruction near the end for the 4-6 classes to finish their projects. This time will provide an additional opportunity for students to ask questions and for demonstration of more embroidery techniques where required.

Session 3: Will include finishing instructions for trimming the embroideries, attaching the backing fabric and pin backs to complete the embroidered patches. All stitching of the embroidered designs should be finished prior to this session.

Please Note: Depending on how fast the students are working (and how involved their designs are) classroom teachers may wish to provide some class time between the virtual sessions for students to work on their stitching independently.

The kits will remain with the class for a number of days after the final session to allow for all students to complete the project. At this point all supplies will be returned to the bags and the kits will be returned to PAINTS.

This project can be very simply executed but has ample room for the more creative and engaged students to put in lots of detail and effort. The end results will hopefully be proudly displayed on jackets and backpacks and give students a real sense of accomplishment!!

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
This workshop will connect students with how to tell their stories with pictures. In a series of 6, 90min sessions, we'll learn the fun and fascinating history of comics and graphic novels, learn how to break down a simple story into a sequence of events, pacing, dialogue and action! Activities will include journaling, storyboarding, drawing and sharing our work with the group. I will be giving recommendations of age appropriate graphic novels and comics for the teens, and I will discuss them during class for inspiration. I will also assign easy and fun exercises that they can complete during the week (no more than 10-30 minutes a week)

Session 1: Let’s get inspired!
30 minutes: Introductions all around. I will show my own work (Published graphic novels and self-published work) I will talk about what got me into comics, and what my typical day looks like.

30 minutes: I will describe what our objectives are in the workshops. 1) To get inspired to make a comic 2) To learn about some of the best comics ever made 3)
To practice our skills and make a short (1-3 page) comic on a topic of our choice.

30 minutes: I will ask participants to talk about what they want to share with their stories, what is inspiring them these days. I will share a diverse reading list of graphic novels and comics to borrow from the local library.

Assignment: A simple journaling worksheet (write a short paragraph detailing an encounter, experience or an inspirational idea) This will be used as the basis of our comic, so this is an important one. Keep it simple!

Session 2: Storyboarding!
30 Minutes: I will ask students to tell me about their journaling worksheet, each participant will read what they have worked on and what they liked, or found challenging about it.
1 hour: I will use examples to show how to break down a paragraph into a series of actions and visuals. We will talk about how to do this with our writing assignment as inspiration. For example, are there parts of the paragraph that they can imagine visually? How would they draw it?
Assignment: Transform your writing assignment into a storyboard! A storyboard is a very simple, pencil line-drawing of your panel layout, using stick figures to sketch out the action, with word bubbles, notes, and ideas written in the margins!

Session 3: Character Design!
1 hour: Sharing the storyboards that each participant made, we will congratulate ourselves on how much we have learned, and discuss what was fun and challenging.
30 Minutes: We will talk about comic styles, using examples from the reading list to show how much variety there is, and to inspire ourselves to create our own style!
Comic style is as varied and unique as the artists themselves. I will show drawings of the most famous comic characters and how to keep it simple.
Assignment: Design your story characters. Draw each character, full body, or an action shot!

Session 4: Final edits, Colour and Shade!
30 Minutes: We will share our drawings and discuss.
1 hour: We will talk about timing, pacing and action shots. I will give tips on focusing on your strengths, and get everyone excited to draw their good copy! We will discuss colour and/or shading and finishing touches.
Assignment: Do a “good copy” of your comic with ink outlines, coloured and/or shaded!

Session 5: Design a Cover!
1 hour: Sharing our good copy of the comics we made, we will congratulate ourselves on how much we have learned, and discuss other ideas and what we learned or want to work on more.
30 Minutes: We will look at famous and wonderful comic book covers from around the world and brainstorm good ideas for titles!
Assignment: Design your cover! Do a full page cover, inked and coloured or shaded!

Session 6: Show and Tell Party!
1.5 hours: We will all share our nice full page covers, and comics, show-and-tell style, and congratulate ourselves! Discuss what we learned, what we loved, what we didn’t like and what we would like to do again

Grade Levels
7 – 9
Project Title : Sashiko Art of Repair This workshop is about sustainable fashion and repair. We will focus on a Japanese technique called Sashiko used to patch and repair clothing using unique stitching that creates beautiful art pieces. Each repair becomes a creative challenge and offers the sewer to express themselves while being mindful of textile waste.

The workshop will be delivered online and will be interactive with the students
with the emphasis on the students learning new techniques and applying
their new skills.

The workshop will be broken down into manageable steps, knowing that students may not have much experience sewing.

Session 1: the history of sashiko, the materials and how to get started
Session 2: hitomezashi sashiko patterns
Session 3: how to apply these techniques to our own clothes - part 1
Session 4: how to apply these techniques to our own clothes - part 2
We will focus our time on how we can apply these techniques to mending our own clothes. This will be a two step process, first we have to sew on a patch, followed by implementing the sashiko stitches.

Materials
A kit will be provided with the fabric, sashiko thread and needles, fabric markers.

Other materials needed:
Rulers
Paper / notebooks for taking notes
Scissors
Garments to patch

Grade Levels
7 – 9, 10 – 12
The workshop presents a step by step approach to making a comic, from rough sketch, through character development, story line, and layout, to a finished one page comic, or single finished page of a longer comic.

Welcome to Comic Book Creations! Our goal is for each student to complete one finished page of a comic by the end of our 4 sessions together. How I plan to take us there is to walk you step by step through the process of making a comic. Each step requires lots of practising of that one little exercise.

Materials for the classroom and that students can also find at home: scrap/sketch paper, pencil, eraser, black marker*. A piece of thicker paper for the finished page. You may choose to add colour at the very end. (Be aware- if you are using a sharpie you can use paint over it but if you are using the kind of marker which runs when you get it wet (do a test) then colouring with pencils, crayons or markers is a better idea.)
(*If you don’t have a black marker any dark colour will work and if you don’t have a marker some other options are : a dark coloured pencil, a black ballpoint pen, a dark wax crayon if it is not too crumbly…)
Before some of the sessions you will be provided with images to download (and print if you want, they are easier to copy from that way—but don’t waste any precious coloured ink! Black and white on scrap paper is fine). After the session I may send a few notes or another image to download.

Set up for teachers:
All materials passed out before the session starts.
The screen where I appear easily visible to all either a large screen or students participating individually through chromebooks for example.
Reference images (sent in advance): I can use screen share for timed, in-class copying but paper or digitally accessible copies for students are important. Details can be worked out with individual teachers.

Homework: this workshop requires students to do drawing work between Zoom sessions (about 1 hour). This can easily be done in class, allowing the teacher to dedicate an art class between the Zoom sessions to this. Or it can be done at home and submitted. The final project requires more time. I allow for 2 weeks after the sessions finish for students to submit the finished page (or pages—some do a full story) to their classroom teacher.

Materials:
-pencils erasers and sketching paper, rulers
-thicker paper and black markers
-(colouring materials optional)